Dental treatment under anaesthesia

  1. What is anaesthesia?
  2. How is anaesthesia given at the dentist?
  3. Tooth extraction under anaesthesia
  4. Dental treatment under anaesthesia for children
  5. Side effects of anaesthesia
  6. What are the costs of treatments under anaesthesia?

 

Performing dental procedures under anaesthesia is a great solution when local anaesthesia does not bring relief to the patient. It also helps treat people who have a fear of the dentist.

 

1. What is anaesthesia?

General anaesthesia is a controlled and temporary method of suspending the patient's reflexes, awareness and sensation. It allows you to easily perform the procedure on the patient without them remembering any unpleasant experiences in the process.

General anaesthesia is performed by an anaesthetist who is responsible for safely putting the patient under anaesthesia, monitoring him throughout the procedure, and waking the patient after the surgery.

Doctors choose dental anaesthesia in cases of extensive conservative treatment, dental surgery or endodontics. It also works great in the treatment children, people with mental disabilities or those suffering from dentophobia.

2. How is anaesthesia given at the dentist?

General anaesthesia brings to mind with major hospital operations, specialists and a lot of assistance. It is similar at the dentist’s office, but there are also a few differences.

To perform dental surgery under anaesthesia, two teams are needed: dental and anaesthesiological. The whole process can take place on an outpatient basis (usually) or in an operating theatre. In both cases, the place should be equipped with apparatus for monitoring the patient’s vital signs and an anti-shock cart in case of emergency. To prevent unnecessary infections aseptic and antiseptic measures are taken.

Anaesthesia is performed by administering drugs either through inhalation, intravenously or by combining both methods. After conducting a pre-anaesthesia interview and reviewing the basic panel of additional tests, the doctor decides whether the patient qualifies for general anaesthesia. Together with the patient, he determines the best method of performing the procedure.

In the event of severe stress or anxiety, the anaesthetist may administer sedatives before anaesthesia. This is called pre-medication.

3. Tooth extraction under anaesthesia

Tooth extraction is a painful and tiring procedure for the patient, especially when you need to get rid of several of them. Here, anaesthesia is a great solution. The entire procedure can be performed in a single visit, while using conventional methods would require spreading the process over many sessions. In addition, the patient does not feel pain and does not remember the procedure, which lets him get through the treatment comfortably.

When choosing to extract teeth under general anaesthesia, the dentist must first perform a dental examination. Next, the anaesthetist qualifies the patient for anaesthesia. After that, all that is left to do is book an appointment for the procedure. If there are any concerns, ask the doctor who can help put your mind at ease.

It is important to come to the procedure on an empty stomach. You must not drink any liquids 2 hours before surgery. Drinking alcohol a few days before anaesthesia is not recommended. Once the procedure is over, the patient remains under observation for a few hours, and then may be collected by a designated carer. Do not drive immediately after dental anaesthesia.

4. Dental treatment under anaesthesia for children

Children are often afraid of dentists and may not be willing to cooperate. Neglecting dental treatment, however, can have very serious consequences in the future. Children should be taught good health habits from an early age.

Anaesthesia is successfully performed in children, and the procedure is similar to the one for adults. The pre-anaesthesia interview is conducted with the child’s guardian. You should bring your child's medical history with you, which will facilitate and accelerate the process. Have your child wear a disposable nappy and stay with them before and after anaesthesia, which will minimise any stress.

5. Side effects of anaesthesia

Like all treatments, general anaesthesia can also have side effects. Being under the care of Medicover specialists, you can be sure that they will make every effort to ensure that the entire healing process goes smoothly.

Side effects may include the body's response to medication or the route of administration. If the anaesthetist uses intravenous agents, you may experience transient phlebitis or short-term pain at the puncture site. After intubation, there may be irritation of the throat or temporary problems with speaking.

An anaphylactic reaction can be a very serious consequence of anaesthesia, which is why it is crucial to conduct a thorough pre-anaesthesia interview.

6. What are the costs of treatments under anaesthesia?

It is very difficult to determine a specific amount for treatment under general anaesthesia. The total cost of treatment depends on:

  • the length, extent and type of dental procedure;
  • the amount of drugs used during surgery;
  • pre-medication procedure;
  • potential consultations;
  • specific city and facility.

The final cost of treatment under anaesthesia is determined individually with the patient.

General anaesthesia may be necessary for certain types of procedures. For minor procedures, it can make the process easier for those afraid of the dentist, children, or people requiring extensive dental work. Anaesthesia performed by professionals is a safe, comfortable and modern method of dealing with stress and unpleasantness associated with dental treatment.

 

References:

  • Zarys anestezjologii i intensywnej terapii, Mayzner-Zawadzka E., Rawicz M. (red.), Warszawa, 2004